Top 10 Business Training Challenges

This article discusses some of the challenges faced by those purchasing business training and issues confronting business training providers. If business is being done with integrity these are closely related as both purchasers (e.g. CEOs, HR managers or training managers) and training providers want effective training that does the job.

Challenges Faced When Purchasing Business Training

Not Sure What Training Is Needed

In order to determine what training is really needed a company should do a training needs analysis (TNA) so as not to waste their time and money.

Not Enough Time

People in businesses are busy and often do not have much time for training. Training can be thought of as an investment and companies can get the most out of training with focused aims and pre- and post-training support from providers.

Not Enough Money

Training need not be expensive. Using small companies with low overheads helps and government grants like Train to Gain in the UK can help. Again being targeted with aims is useful. E-Learning may be cheaper but often does not do the job and lacks the essential “human touch”.

Not Enough Trust

How do you know if a trainer provider is any good? Ask for references from past clients and a free taster session with your own team to build trust before embarking on a large scale training program.

Not Sure If Training Works

It is important to measure return on investment of training by asking ahead of time, “What would success look like here and how would we measure it?”

Challenges Faced by Business Training Providers

As Above

Training providers face many of the same problems of those purchasing training. Doing things in less and less time, and with less budget is the modern challenge. A good training provider will help clients find out what is needed, make good use of pre and post course support to maximise limited contact time and help evaluate training success.

Delegates Not “Bought-In”

Delegates turning up late or not wanting to learn is a problem for many trainers. This often indicates an issue with the commissioning process as delegates have not bought-into the training as something desirable. It may mean the TNA has not been done correctly or the “internal sell” was handled clumsily. One solution is to establish learning aims in line with what delegates want at the start of training and make it clear that participation is optional.

Inadequate Facilities or Technology

A good training provider makes use of what they have and has a low-tech plan B for when the technology breaks down.

Delegates Tired or Bored

Keeping training interactive and experiential will alleviate this problem. Use teaching appropriate for different learning styles and take regular breaks.

No “Real-World Transfer”

Training has a bad reputation in many businesses as people will often go on a course, then promptly forget everything they have learned. It is important to embed learning in real-world applications and give participants ways to continue learning after the contact time.

Top 10 Business Training Challenges

This article discusses some of the challenges faced by those purchasing business training and issues confronting business training providers. If business is being done with integrity these are closely related as both purchasers (e.g. CEOs, HR managers or training managers) and training providers want effective training that does the job.

Challenges Faced When Purchasing Business Training

Not Sure What Training Is Needed

In order to determine what training is really needed a company should do a training needs analysis (TNA) so as not to waste their time and money.

Not Enough Time

People in businesses are busy and often do not have much time for training. Training can be thought of as an investment and companies can get the most out of training with focused aims and pre- and post-training support from providers.

Not Enough Money

Training need not be expensive. Using small companies with low overheads helps and government grants like Train to Gain in the UK can help. Again being targeted with aims is useful. E-Learning may be cheaper but often does not do the job and lacks the essential “human touch”.

Not Enough Trust

How do you know if a trainer provider is any good? Ask for references from past clients and a free taster session with your own team to build trust before embarking on a large scale training program.

Not Sure If Training Works

It is important to measure return on investment of training by asking ahead of time, “What would success look like here and how would we measure it?”

Challenges Faced by Business Training Providers

As Above

Training providers face many of the same problems of those purchasing training. Doing things in less and less time, and with less budget is the modern challenge. A good training provider will help clients find out what is needed, make good use of pre and post course support to maximise limited contact time and help evaluate training success.

Delegates Not “Bought-In”

Delegates turning up late or not wanting to learn is a problem for many trainers. This often indicates an issue with the commissioning process as delegates have not bought-into the training as something desirable. It may mean the TNA has not been done correctly or the “internal sell” was handled clumsily. One solution is to establish learning aims in line with what delegates want at the start of training and make it clear that participation is optional.

Inadequate Facilities or Technology

A good training provider makes use of what they have and has a low-tech plan B for when the technology breaks down.

Delegates Tired or Bored

Keeping training interactive and experiential will alleviate this problem. Use teaching appropriate for different learning styles and take regular breaks.

No “Real-World Transfer”

Training has a bad reputation in many businesses as people will often go on a course, then promptly forget everything they have learned. It is important to embed learning in real-world applications and give participants ways to continue learning after the contact time.

How to Conduct Business at Home

It is getting more and more common for moms who work at home, giving them the luxuries of flexibility with time. This article hopes to share seven tips with work from home moms about how to conduct business from home.

1. Buy supplies in double quantities so that you will not have to dash out in the middle of a project to buy an item you have run out of.

2. To distinguish between your business and personal life, “dress” for work. Do not sit around in your bathrobe all day.

3. “Walk to work”. Walk around the block and back home. You will get a little morning exercise, and you will arrive at your “office” in a more businesslike frame of mind that is refreshed and ready for work.

4. Maybe no one will see your office, but clutter can draw on your energy. Throw out dead plants, close closet doors, banish the cat from your desktop.

5. Be firm with people who interrupt. Because you are at home, others may not take your work as seriously as compared to when you go to an office.

6. Handle interruptions just as you would at an office – tell others when you will be free. If friends call during working hours, resist the temptation to socialize. Arrange to call them back later.

7. Ideally, your home office should be in a separate room. However, if one is not available, choose a corner that will belong to you and you alone. If necessary, invest in partitions to separate yourself psychologically from the rest of the house. In selecting an area, consider whether there is enough space for a desk and other equipment.